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    Microsoft Signs 10-Year Binding Contract to Bring Call of Duty to Nintendo Platforms

    A signed and dotted agreement.

    Microsoft vice chair and president Brad Smith announced the company has signed an 10-year binding legal contract to bring Call of Duty to Nintendo platforms. The agreement was signed just two months after Microsoft entered a formal commitment to bring the franchise to Nintendo.

    The new contract comes as Microsoft battles scrutiny by EU regulators over the acquisition of Activision Blizzard. Moreover, Microsoft publicly vows to bring Call of Duty to Nintendo, PC, and PlayStation gamers after the completion of the acquisition. The company reiterates its desire for competition and choice in gaming despite the ire of regulators opposing the Activision Blizzard acquisition.

    “We’ve now signed a binding 10-year contract to bring Xbox games to Nintendo’s gamers, Smith said on Twitter. “This is just part of our commitment to bring Xbox games and Activision titles like Call of Duty to more players on more platforms.”

    The company’s official statement reads, “Microsoft and Nintendo have now negotiated and signed a binding 10-year legal agreement to bring Call of Duty to Nintendo players – the same day as Xbox, with full feature and content parity – so they can experience Call of Duty just as Xbox and PlayStation gamers enjoy Call of Duty. We are committed to providing long term equal access to Call of Duty to other gaming platforms, bringing more choice to more players and more competition to the gaming market.”

    Lastly, visit Final Weapon’s extensive review coverage of Japanese games below:

    Soul Kiwami
    Soul Kiwami
    Raul Ochoa, a.k.a. Soul Kiwami, is the Managing Editor of Final Weapon and a Games Writer at Game Rant with four years of writing and editing experience. Raul is passionate about the Japanese gaming industry, and he's a huge fan of Nintendo Switch, PC hardware, JRPGs, and fighting games. business email: [email protected]

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